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      Richelieu: o cardeal que matou Deus.

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      Edward Blake
      Membro Novato
      # jul/16 · Editado por: Edward Blake


      Se Deus existe, Richelieu terá muito de que prestar contas. Se não, bem... ele teve uma vida bem-sucedida. (Papa Urbano VIII)

      Few statesmen can claim a greater impact on history. Richelieu was the father of the modern state system. He promulgated the concept of raison d'état and practiced it relentlessly for the benefit of his own country. Under his auspices, raison d'état replaced the medieval concept of universal moral values as the operating principle of French policy. Initially, he sought to prevent Habsburg domination of Europe, but ultimately left a legacy that for the next two centuries tempted his successors to establish French primacy in Europe. Out of the failure of these ambitions, a balance of power emerged, first as a fact of life, then as a system for organizing international relations.

      Richelieu came into office in 1624, when the Habsburg Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand II was attempting to revive Catholic universality, stamp out Protestantism, and establish imperial control over the princes of Central Europe. This process, the Counter-Reformation, led to what was later called the Thirty Years' War, which erupted in Central Europe in 1618 and turned into one of the most brutal and destructive wars in the history of mankind.

      As a prince of the Church, Richelieu ought to have welcomed Ferdinand's drive to restore Catholic orthodoxy. But Richelieu put the French national interest above any religious goals. His vocation as cardinal did not keep Richelieu from seeing the Habsburg attempt to re-establish the Catholic religion as a geopolitical threat to France's security. To him, it was not a religious act but a political maneuver by Austria to achieve dominance in Central Europe and thereby to reduce France to second-class status.

      Richelieu derived little comfort from the fact that Spain and Austria shared France's Catholic faith. Quite to the contrary, a victory for the Counter-Reformation was exactly what Richelieu was determined to prevent. In pursuit of what would today be called a national Security interest and was then labeled—for the first time—raison d'état, Richelieu was prepared to side with the Protestant princes and exploit the Schism within the Universal Church.

      Had the Habsburg emperors played according to the same rules or understood the emerging world of raison d'état, they would have seen how well placed they were to achieve what Richelieu feared most—the pre-eminence of Austria and the emergence of the Holy Roman Empire as the dominant power on the Continent. Through the centuries, however, the enemies of the Habsburgs benefited from the dynasty's rigidity in adjusting to tactical necessities or understanding future trends. The Habsburg rulers were men of principle. They never compromised their convictions except in defeat. At the start of this political Odyssey, therefore, they were quite defenseless against the ruthless Cardinal's machinations.

      Emperor Ferdinand II, Richelieu's foil, had almost certainly never heard of raison d'état. Even if he had, he would have rejected it as blasphemy, for he saw his secular mission as carrying out the will of God, and always stressed the "holy” in his title as Holy Roman Emperor. Never would he have conceded that divine ends could be achieved by less than moral means. Never would he have thought of concluding treaties with the Protestant Swedes or the Muslim Turks, measures which the Cardinal pursued as a matter of course. (…)

      A ruler committed to such absolute values found it impossible to compromise, let alone to manipulate, his bargaining position. In 1596, while still an archduke, Ferdinand declared, “I would rather die than grant any concessions to the Sectarians when it comes to religion.” To the detriment of his empire, he certainly lived up to his words. Since he was less concerned with the Empire's welfare than with obeisance to the will of God, he considered himself duty-bound to crush Protestantism even though some accommodation with it clearly would have been in his best interests. In modern terms, he was a fanatic. The words of one of the imperial advisers, Caspar Scioppius, highlight the Emperor's beliefs: “Woe to the king who ignores the voice of God beseeching him to kill the heretics. You should not wage war for yourself, but for God” (Bellum non tuum, Sed Dei esse Statuas). For Ferdinand, the state existed in order to Serve religion, not vice versa: “In matters of state, which are so important for Our holy Confession, one cannot always take into account human considerations, rather, he must hope... in God... and trust only in Him.”

      Richelieu treated Ferdinand's faith as a strategic challenge. Though privately religious, he viewed his duties as minister in entirely secular terms. Salvation might be his personal objective, but to Richelieu, the Statesman, it was irrelevant. "Man is immortal, his salvation is hereafter,” he once said. "The State has no immortality, its salvation is now or never.” In other words, states do not receive credit in any world for doing what is right; they are only rewarded for being strong enough to do what is necessary.

      Richelieu would never have permitted himself to miss the opportunity which presented itself to Ferdinand in 1629, the eleventh year of the war. The Protestant princes were ready to accept Habsburg political pre-eminence provided they remained free to pursue the religion of their choice and to retain the Church lands they had seized during the Reformation. But Ferdinand would not subordinate his religious vocation to his political needs. Rejecting what would have been a vast triumph and the guarantee of his Empire, determined to stamp out the Protestant heresy, he issued the Edict of Restitution, which demanded that Protestant sovereigns restore all the lands they had seized from the Church since 1555. It was a triumph of zeal over expediency, a classic case in which faith overrode calculations of political self-interest. And it guaranteed a battle to the finish.

      Handed this opening, Richelieu was determined to prolong the war until Central Europe had been bled white. He put aside religious scruples with respect to domestic policy as well. In the Grace of Alais of 1629, he granted to French Protestants freedom of worship, the very same freedom the Emperor was fighting to deny the German princes. Having protected his country against the domestic upheavals rending Central Europe, Richelieu set out to exploit Ferdinand's religious fervor in the service of French national ends.

      The Habsburg Emperor's inability to understand his national interests — indeed, his refusal to accept the validity of any such concept— gave France's First Minister the opportunity to support and to subsidize the Protestant German princes against the Holy Roman Emperor. The role of defender of the liberties of the Protestant princes against the centralizing goals of the Holy Roman Emperor was an unlikely one for a French prelate and his Catholic French King, Louis XIII. That a prince of the Church was subsidizing the Protestant King of Sweden, Gustavus Adolphus, to make war against the Holy Roman Emperor had revolutionary implications as profound as the upheavals of the French Revolution 150 years later.

      In an age still dominated by religious zeal and ideological fanaticism, a dispassionate foreign policy free of moral imperatives stood out like a snow-covered Alp in the desert. Richelieu's objective was to end what he considered the encirclement of France, to exhaust the Habsburgs, and to prevent the emergence of a major power on the borders of France - especially the German border. His only criterion in making alliances was that they served France's interests, and this he did at first with the Protestant states and, later, even with the Muslim Ottoman Empire. In order to exhaust the belligerents and to prolong the war, Richelieu subsidized the enemies of his enemies, bribed, fomented insurrections, and mobilized an extraordinary array of dynastic and legal arguments. He succeeded so well that the war that had begun in 1618 dragged on decade after decade until, finally, history found no more appropriate name for it than its duration—the Thirty Years' War.

      KISSINGER, Henry. Diplomacy. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1994, pp. 58-62.

      One More Red Nightmare
      Veterano
      # jul/16
      · votar


      Interessante.

      sallqantay
      Veterano
      # jul/16
      · votar


      da hora, o mano é tipo o Thomas Hobbes da práxis

      KISSINGER, Henry

      não usou aspas, mas floreou demais (síndrome de Galvão Bueno)

      One More Red Nightmare
      Veterano
      # jul/16
      · votar


      Eu achei bem escrito.

      sallqantay
      Veterano
      # jul/16
      · votar


      One More Red Nightmare

      claro, você é um pedante sacripantas que nem ele

      Edward Blake
      Membro Novato
      # jul/16 · Editado por: Edward Blake
      · votar


      sallqantay
      da hora, o mano é tipo o Thomas Hobbes da práxis

      Richelieu mostrou ao Ocidente, com séculos de antecedência, como funcionava na prática o dilema do prisioneiro: ou você é o predador, ou você é a presa.

      sallqantay
      Veterano
      # jul/16
      · votar


      Edward Blake

      vamos ver como seus discípulos se saem ao novo levante mouro

      One More Red Nightmare
      Veterano
      # 05/out/18 10:35
      · votar


      up

      makumbator
      Veterano
      # 05/out/18 10:38
      · votar


      Eu joguei god of war 2, 3 e 4 então já matei deuses pra cacete. Um a mais ou a menos não faz mais diferença.

      sallqantay
      Veterano
      # 05/out/18 12:10
      · votar


      esse kissinger é um lambe saco proficional, tocou mais cotovelos que todos

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